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“…that vast book which stands forever opened before our eyes, I mean the universe, … cannot be read until we have learned the language… It is written in mathematical language, … without which… it is humanly impossible to comprehend a single word.” — Galileo, the Father of Modern Science.

Everyone knows about honey bees. However, the bees have known what human mathematicians didn’t know for thousands of years. A honeybee may be the most extraordinary creature in the universe. Its body is beautifully patterned, can fly wherever it wants, spends its time near beautiful flowers, produces the most delicious and incredible substance in nature, honey, and, most importantly, it is a great mathematician. The amount of knowledge they have of the world around them is comparable to graduating from the best science and engineering schools. They show us that mathematics is the language of nature and science. Aristotle was…


It was finally the weekend! After my long mathematics presentation, I came home to watch my favorite tv show, Person of Interest, to de-stress. Surprisingly, the episode was about the most famous mathematical constant, pi (π), equal to the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter, commonly approximated as 3.14159. Mr. Finch (the main character) acted as a substitute teacher and wrote on the chalkboard 3.1415926535. Then he asked the students, “What does this mean?”

I answered the question in my mind, thinking, “If I have a bicycle tire with a diameter of 1, then one full revolution of…


Archimedes used calculus as a simple way of thinking that was never seen before. On the other hand, Richard Feynman held that calculus was the language that God had used when creating this universe. In reality, both are correct. Not only is calculus a form of thinking, but it is also a way to explain an unknown occurrence. If we look further into it, we can assume that they are the same thing. After all, language is the spoken form of thoughts. (Let us ignore those who talk without thinking).

Ever since Leibniz proposed calculus to the world, mathematicians and…


When I close my eyes and go back in time, I see a college student sitting in the back row and looking sad while the professor is standing next to the chalkboard, writing mathematical definitions on it with chalk. The click, click, click sound was still obvious every time the professor wrote on the blackboard. Then, the student goes into deep thought when the professor said:

“For every epsilon greater than 0 [ε>0], there exists a delta greater than 0. [ δ>0]”

Upon hearing this, the student asked himself repeatedly: What does epsilon mean? That student actually was me. Although…


On a snowy day in London, as he was lying in bed and gazing at the ceiling, Sherlock Holmes’ mind was once again at work trying to crack yet another case. It wasn’t long before Dr. Watson came knocking at the door and described to him a most peculiar murder case. Sherlock at first paid no attention to any of what Watson had to say. However, when Watson told him of the tracks from the bicycle with which the culprit had made his getaway, Sherlock suddenly turned to him and said, “well, now, why don’t we have a look at…


“In mathematics the art of proposing a question must be held of higher value than solving it.” This analysis belongs to the undervalued genius of his time, Georg Cantor.

One of the significant losses in this day and age is how unexcited we are about everything. Many people seem not to be affected by discoveries and information, which is one thing that Georg Cantor was very diligent in avoiding. He seldom lost his excitement for anything. Prime examples of this include how one day when he was in deep thought, he realized that any line segment’s points match all points of three-dimensional space. Realizing this, he immediately sent a note to one of the only people that could correctly understand this, his friend Julies Dedekind, saying:

“Je le vois…


I have been working in the field of education for almost a decade. My teaching experience showed me that if we do not find the most efficient way to teach mathematics to our students, we cannot be good educators no matter how hard we try.

What I learned from my students is that they love playing games. A good math game can make the kids learn in a more fun and interactive way. Since then, I have been trying to find some cool math games that I can use in my classroom.

I have curated some of my favorite math…


Sometimes I find myself thinking, what if we did not have the unique number “pi”? Probably, everything would change. Our beautiful mathematics turn strange; maybe even the earth would go awry and wouldn’t orbit the sun. If the world is still not so bad, it is because of that notorious constant number pi.

By the way, I assumed we all know what pi is since middle school. Our teacher showed us that “pi” (π) is an irrational number, which is the ratio of a circle’s circumference (2πr) to its diameter (2r). In other words, when you measure a circular object…


Before starting my mathematics education, rain was a significant natural occurrence for me. Right after the rain had ended, I would run to the streets and put the paper boat that my father would make for me into the side of our street where water had collected. In my university life, my favorite pastime was riding my bike in the rain. I learned to love birds while they were drinking the rainwater in the bucket my grandmother had set up for them. Getting wet in the rain was never a problem in my life. …


I remember that my mathematical education has started with numbers. First, my father, then later, my elementary teacher, taught me how to count as my elementary math education. However, 2400 years ago, everything was utterly different, and kids were taught geometry first.

Before Jesus, geometry was more important than numbers. For instance, when the founder of the first institution of higher education in the Western world, Plato, came back to Athens, he decided to found the “Academy” where it would be the intellectual center of the world (Wikipedia, “Plato”). For that purpose, instead of taking a nonrefundable application fee, he…

Ali

Math Teacher. Content Curator. Soccer player. Maradona fan. Mostly write about the lectures I love to learn better. alikayaspor@gmail.com

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